Plumbing a Kitchen Part 1 of 5

Return to Step by Step Listings

Plumbing a remodeled kitchen is a relatively easy job if your kitchen includes only a wall sink. If your project includes an island sink, however, the work becomes more complicated.

 

Difficulty Level:
Time to Complete:
Estimated Cost:
Continue to Step 1

Overview

Plumbing a remodeled kitchen is a relatively easy job if your kitchen includes only a wall sink. If your project includes an island sink, however, the work becomes more complicated. An island sink poses problems because there is no wall in which to run a vent pipe. An island sink requires either a complicated configuration known as a loop vent or a device called an air admittance valve (AAV), now approved by most codes. An AAV eliminates the need for a loop vent in most island sink installations. Check with the local plumbing inspector before designing an installation with an AAV or a loop vent. For our demonstration kitchen, we divided the project into three phases:
• How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink
• How to Install DWV Pipes for an Island Sink
• How to Install New Supply Pipes
Our demonstration kitchen includes a double wall sink and an island sink. The 1 1⁄2" drain for the wall sink connects to an existing 2" galvanized waste-vent stack; since the trap is within 3 1⁄2 ft. of the stack, no vent pipe is required. The drain for the island sink uses a loop vent configuration connected to an auxiliary waste-vent stack in the basement.
From: The Complete Guide to Plumbing, 978-1-58923-378-2

What You'll Need

Tools:

drill
hole saw
reciprocating saw
metal cutting blade
solvent glue
screwdriver
ratchet wrench
pipe
tubing cutter or hacksaw
banded couplings

Materials:

drill
hole saw
reciprocating saw
metal cutting blade
solvent glue
screwdriver
ratchet wrench
pipe
tubing cutter or hacksaw
banded couplings

 

Step 1

Tips for Plumbing a Kitchen

Insulate exterior walls if you live in a region with freezing winter temperatures. Where possible, run water supply pipes through the floor or interior partition walls, rather than exterior walls.


Step 2

Tips for Plumbing a Kitchen

Use existing waste-vent stacks to connect the new DWV pipes. In addition to a main waste-vent stack, most homes have one or more auxiliary waste-vent stacks in the kitchen that can be used to connect new DWV pipes.


Step 3

Tips for Plumbing a Kitchen

Loop vents makes it possible to vent a sink when there is no adjacent wall to house the vent pipe. The drain is vented with a loop of pipe that arches up against the countertop and away from the drain before dropping through the floor. The vent pipe then runs horizontally to an existing vent pipe. In our project, we have tied the island vent to a vent pipe extending up from a basement utility sink. Note: Loop vents are subject to local code restrictions. Always consult your building inspector for guidelines on venting an island sink.


Step 4

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Determine the location of the sink drain by marking the position of the sink and base cabinet on the floor. Mark a point on the floor indicating the position of the sink drain opening. This point will serve as a reference for aligning the sink drain stub-out.


Step 5

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Mark a route for the new drain pipe through the studs behind the wall sink cabinet. The drain pipe should angle 1⁄4" per foot down toward the waste-vent stack.


Step 6

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Use a right‑angle drill and hole saw to bore holes for the drain pipe. On non-loadbearing studs, such as the cripple studs beneath a window, you can notch the studs with a reciprocating saw to simplify the installation of the drain pipe. If the studs are loadbearing, however, you must thread the run though the bored holes, using couplings to join short lengths of pipe as you create the run.


Step 7

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Measure, cut, and dry-fit a horizontal drain pipe to run from the waste-vent stack to the sink drain stub-out. Create the stub-out with a 45° elbow and 6" length of 11⁄2" pipe. Note: If the sink trap in your installation will be more than 3 1⁄2 ft. from the waste-vent pipe, you will have to install a waste-T and run a vent pipe up the wall, connecting it to the vent stack at a point at least 6" above the lip of the sink.


Step 8

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Remove the neoprene sleeve from a banded coupling, then roll the lip back and measure the thickness of the separator ring.


Step 9

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Attach two lengths of 2" pipe, at least 4" long, to the top and bottom openings on a 2" x 2" x 1 1⁄2" waste-T. Hold the fitting alongside the waste-vent stack, then mark the stack for cutting, allowing space for the separator rings on the banded couplings.


Step 10

How to Install DWV Pipes for a Wall Sink

Use riser clamps and 2 x 4 blocking to support the waste-vent stack above and below the new drain pipe, then cut out the waste-vent stack along the marked lines, using a reciprocating saw and metal-cutting blade.


 
 

Comments

Before you can comment, please Sign Up or Log In

© Copyright 2014, Black & Decker Inc. All rights reserved. "BLACK & DECKER","BLACK+DECKER", and the BLACK & DECKER and BLACK+DECKER logos and product names are either registered trade marks or trade marks of "The Black & Decker Corporation"

Forgot Password?

x